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HOW TO TRAVEL AROUND BERLIN

The City's Public Transportation in Brief

The city's public transport system is the most convenient way to travel around Berlin. You can choose between a wide range of services including the metro, trains, buses and trams that serve about 2.6 million passengers a day!

Travel Zones

The city and its surroundings are split into three zones. Zone A covers the city center, Zone B the outskirts of the capital and Zone C goes beyond the city's boundaries and allows you to travel places like Potsdam and Schoenefeld Airport.

Ticket options

Same tickets are used for all public transport. You can choose from a variety of options including the following:

  • Short-trip ticket (Kurzstreckentarif) for traveling up to 3 U-Bahn (underground lines) or S-Bahn (elevated lines) stations or 6 bus or tram stops. You can use the short-trip ticket for all zone but keep in mind that it is not valid for regional trains. It costs 1.70 .
  • Single ticket (Normaltarif) for traveling up to 2 hours with an unlimited number of changes towards your destination. Though, it doesn't allow you to make round-trips. It costs between 2.70and 3.30 depending on the zone. A 4-Trip-ticket (4-Fahrten-Karte) is available for zones A and B for 9.00.
  • Day ticket (Tageskarte) valid until 3.00am the following day. It costs between 7.00and 7.60 depending on the zones you wish to include.
  • 7 Day Ticket (Wochenkarte) is valid for 7 days starting from the day of validation. This ticket is transferable. It costs between 30.00and 37.20depending on the zones.

Where to buy?

Tickets are available at multilingual ticket machines at all S-Bahn and U-Bahn stops or at ticket counters on some bigger stations. In trams the ticket machines are inside the tram, but in the buses the tickets are sold by the bus driver himself.

Ticket validation

With the exception of tickets purchased from a bus driver directly, all other tickets must be validated in a ticket stamping machine either before boarding (on train or metro platforms) or upon boarding of buses and trams (located near doorways).

U-bahn (Metro)

With 173 stations and 10 lines, it is in my opinion the best way to travel around Berlin. The metro stations are located very central to each and every tourist's attraction. During the rush hours, it can be your life saver if you need to get quickly from point A to B. The first trains start to operate around 4.00 am and finish their service after midnight. During peak time the metro runs every 2-5 minutes and every 5 minutes during the rest of the day.

S-Bahn

Operating on 15 lines and 166 stations, it is especially useful in getting fast to the outlying areas of the city. Train stations can be identified by the green and white S symbol. It starts its service around 4.30am and stops around 1.30am. It runs in 5, 10 or 20 minutes intervals depending on the time of the day. On the weekends it is available 24 hours with 30 minutes intervals during the night time.

Buses

Berlin has a dense network of around 300 daytime and 45 nighttime bus lines (which substitute the U-Bahn during weekdays). There are 17 additional MetroBus which run in areas where U-Bahn and S-Bahn routes are poorly served. If you wish to view some famous sights of the city, you can choose the well-known 100 line, which goes from Alexanderplatz to Zoological Garden.

Trams

Founded in 1865 it is the oldest tram network worldwide! There are 22 tram lines out of which 9 are designed as MetroTram, serving areas poorly represented by U-Bahn and S-Bahn routes. Trams can mainly be seen in the East part of the city, though recently some lines have been extended into the Western half of the capital.

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